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By Kevin Mclaughlin

This publication argues that the idea of strength elaborated in Immanuel Kant's aesthetics (and specifically, his theorization of the dynamic elegant) is of decisive significance to poetry within the 19th century and to the relationship among poetry and philosophy during the last centuries. encouraged by way of his deep engagement with the severe thought of Walter Benjamin, who in particular built this Kantian pressure of considering, Kevin McLaughlin makes use of this conception of strength to light up the paintings of 3 of the main influential nineteenth-century writers of their respective nationwide traditions: Friedrich Hölderlin, Charles Baudelaire, and Matthew Arnold. the result's a very good elucidation of Kantian thought and a clean account of poetic language and its aesthetic, moral, and political chances.

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Poetic Force: Poetry after Kant (Meridian: Crossing Aesthetics)

This e-book argues that the idea of strength elaborated in Immanuel Kant's aesthetics (and particularly, his theorization of the dynamic elegant) is of decisive significance to poetry within the 19th century and to the relationship among poetry and philosophy over the past centuries. encouraged via his deep engagement with the severe thought of Walter Benjamin, who specially built this Kantian pressure of considering, Kevin McLaughlin makes use of this conception of strength to light up the paintings of 3 of the main influential nineteenth-century writers of their respective nationwide traditions: Friedrich Hölderlin, Charles Baudelaire, and Matthew Arnold.

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1: 433; Essays and Letters, 153) The letter to Böhlendorff, which echoes Kant’s evocation of the natural power calling forth the greater power of aesthetic judgment (“thunderclouds piling up in the sky . 30 Granted to the “poor and rich” of the poem, as to Hölderlin after he was “struck by Apollo,” is the time of the “thinking” that Kant distinguishes from “knowing” or “cognizing” in the first Critique—mental time off from cognition. 31 This power is the source of the first alteration in strophe 5: in the earlier version the day granted was “joyful” ( fröhlich), now it is Force and Image from Kant to Benjamin  “thinking” (denkend ).

3 Thinking communio in the sense of a nonempirical simultaneity or of a community that exists “where perceptions do not reach” becomes one of the fundamental imperatives of reason in the wake of critical philosophy. Reason after Kant, in this sense, dictates a vision of community as a matter, not of common possession of a thing like a parcel of land or sea, but of a communicability shared by all rational beings. Being able to see this requires the capacity for envisioning community that Kant attributes to the poets.

In the Force and Image from Kant to Benjamin  case of Benjamin’s late work on Paris, even the time of working on the project is included in his notes as evidence of the spacing of time. 2: 1037–38; Â�Arcades, 867). Instead of flowing progressively, time at such points turns and is suddenly spatialized. ” Yet in order to turn€around, time must first space. 1: 587; Arcades, 470). The Paris of the late studies is, in this sense, the field of Benjamin’s labors. Not objects or things from the past viewed from the perspective of the present, but sources with the capacity to impart “what has been” to the “now” are what concerns him.

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